Sydney teachers’ strike: Malcolm Turnbull’s daughter slams the shameful way Australians talk about careers

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Malcolm Turnbull’s teacher daughter SLAMS the ‘insulting’ way Australians talk about her profession in a series of scathing tweets

  • Daisy Turnbull has criticized the public’s treatment of Australian teachers
  • The daughter of former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull sparked a debate on Twitter
  • She lamented the treatment of striking educators as opposed to nurses and soldiers
  • Comments come after Senator Hollie Hughes called teachers ‘Marxists’

Daisy Turnbull has slammed the public’s treatment of Australian teachers after a Liberal MP called educators ‘Marxists’ – as thousands of staff prepare to go on strike.

The daughter of former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who worked for eight years as a teacher and headmistress at an elite private school in Sydney’s east, has responded to comments by Senator Hollie Hughes who blamed the education system to have a “very left turn”.

Ms Hughes said schools were now filled with lessons on revolutionary theories, including those of economist John Keynes ‘if not Marxism’ – with Ms Turnbull lamenting the treatment of teachers over other crucial workers.

“I often wonder, as a ‘Marxist’ teacher, what would be the response if an MP talked about nurses or soldiers the way they talk about teachers?” she tweeted.

Daisy Turnbull, the daughter of former Prime Minister Malcolm, has slammed the treatment of Australian teachers after a Liberal MP called educators ‘Marxists’

On Tuesday, Senator Hughes said the Education Department had adopted a “woke agenda” for child-rearing and removed crucial literature from the curriculum.

She referenced John Keynes, a British scholar who changed mainstream perceptions of macroeconomics with alternative views on trade, the free market and inflation.

The Liberal MP said modern school systems were designed to cater to the left rather than a comprehensive education with conservative principles.

“Children don’t learn certain books anymore because whoever wrote them was in a completely different time than we live in now,” she told Sky News.

“We see an almost awakened program being put on all kinds of programs now.”

Ms Turnbull, the former director of wellbeing at the prestigious St Catherine’s School in Waverley, has been hit with a wave of backlash.

One punter noted that teachers have a unique responsibility – given that they have been tasked with caring for our children.

Senator Hollie Hughes said the Education Department had adopted a

Senator Hollie Hughes said the Education Department had adopted a “woke agenda” for raising children and removed crucial literature from the curriculum.

“There is a specific responsibility that comes with such a crucial role, replied a man named Richard.

Ms Turnbull replied: ‘Absolutely agree, which then begs the question why do people without a degree or teaching experience think they know more about education than teachers?

“Maybe if people didn’t throw insults at teachers all the time, there wouldn’t be such a shortage of teachers.”

Ms Turnbull lamented the treatment of teachers compared to other essential workers including nurses and soldiers

Ms Turnbull lamented the treatment of teachers compared to other essential workers including nurses and soldiers

Thousands of state and Catholic school teachers across NSW will walk off the job on Thursday in the biggest strike in nearly two decades.

The NSW Teachers Federation and the Independent Education Union of Australia have organized a joint operation with the industry in crisis on staff shortages, low pay and increased workload.

The two groups have not worked together since 1996, but joined together in response to the ‘manifest failure’ of the NSW government and Catholic schools to provide appropriate teaching environments.

“This action testifies to the crisis in which we find ourselves,” said the president of the Federation of Teachers, Angelo Gavrielatos.

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Thousands of state and Catholic school teachers across NSW will leave work on Thursday in the biggest strike in nearly two decades

“Hundreds of classes every day, and thousands and thousands of students, are being denied their education and their future.”

The two unions represent more than 75% of educators in the state.

Thursday’s strike will be the third for public school teachers in the state in just six months, and the second for Catholic teachers.

They will travel from all over New South Wales to take part in the march on Macquarie Street in front of parliament.

“Both unions have come to the conclusion that the government has its head in the sand when it comes to the teacher crisis,” Gavrielatos said.

“The government is trying to silence teachers and head teachers about the impact of vacancies within their school communities.

“We have no choice but to demonstrate in this unprecedented way the anger felt by the profession across the state.”

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